Embroidery

THE WATER SPRING  Cotton thread on linen.  As Israelis splash around in their swimming pools, irrigate their farms, and boast about making the desert bloom, access to water for Palestinians is not only a challenge, but already a full blown crisis with Israel controlling and restricting all the water and water-related infrastructure in the West Bank and Gaza. In Gaza, ninety to ninety-five percent of the water is contaminated and unfit for human consumption. Though they consume four times the amount of water as the Palestinians (who consume less than the World Health Organization’s daily minimum recommendation), settlers in the West Bank are not feeling the effects of the inevitable droughts and dry spells that will continue to effect the region due to global warming and climate change, since 90% of water from the West Bank Aquifer is being diverted to Israel leaving only 10% access for Palestinians, destroying Palestinian agriculture and economy. This piece communicates with the symbolic language of Palestinian embroidery worn by Palestinian women who lived on farms and in villages to express their localized identities and personal stories. The disappearing Palestinian embroidery motifs of regional plants, barbed wire and the water springs represent the devastating effect on agriculture in the West Bank caused by the forced separation and restriction to clean and safe water sources. Here is a peek into the near and ominous future where Israel continues to deny Palestinians their human right to water for agriculture and domestic use, adding climate refugees to the pre-existing Palestinian refugee crisis while further aiding in the ethnic cleansing of the indigenous population.

THE WATER SPRING
Cotton thread on linen.

As Israelis splash around in their swimming pools, irrigate their farms, and boast about making the desert bloom, access to water for Palestinians is not only a challenge, but already a full blown crisis with Israel controlling and restricting all the water and water-related infrastructure in the West Bank and Gaza. In Gaza, ninety to ninety-five percent of the water is contaminated and unfit for human consumption. Though they consume four times the amount of water as the Palestinians (who consume less than the World Health Organization’s daily minimum recommendation), settlers in the West Bank are not feeling the effects of the inevitable droughts and dry spells that will continue to effect the region due to global warming and climate change, since 90% of water from the West Bank Aquifer is being diverted to Israel leaving only 10% access for Palestinians, destroying Palestinian agriculture and economy. This piece communicates with the symbolic language of Palestinian embroidery worn by Palestinian women who lived on farms and in villages to express their localized identities and personal stories. The disappearing Palestinian embroidery motifs of regional plants, barbed wire and the water springs represent the devastating effect on agriculture in the West Bank caused by the forced separation and restriction to clean and safe water sources. Here is a peek into the near and ominous future where Israel continues to deny Palestinians their human right to water for agriculture and domestic use, adding climate refugees to the pre-existing Palestinian refugee crisis while further aiding in the ethnic cleansing of the indigenous population.

ENTANGLEMENT  Cotton thread on cotton fabric. 15 x 30 cm.  Through the medium of Palestinian cross-stitch hand embroidery, two identical yet separate motifs are joined to represent the concept of entanglement. The theory of quantum entanglement states that even if two particles are physically separated, they can still be connected. Karmic entanglement also speaks of the connection, regardless of space or time, between individuals, an individual to a group of people, or an individual to a belief. In this piece, traditional rules of the symbolic language of Palestinian embroidery are broken and a new translation of the motif is formulated. By understanding entanglement in visual or symbolic terms, an opportunity is created to consider the connecting force or frequency and recognise it as love. Threads emerge from and connect to the four squares centred in each motif, resembling the four chambers of the heart, removing the illusion of separateness while leaving behind the ultimate essence of oneness.  This piece currently on display in the Made In Tashkeel exhibition at Tashkeel in Dubai until September 10th.   https://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/art/tashkeel-s-summer-exhibition-celebrating-an-incredible-decade-of-achievement-1.878469

ENTANGLEMENT

Cotton thread on cotton fabric. 15 x 30 cm.

Through the medium of Palestinian cross-stitch hand embroidery, two identical yet separate motifs are joined to represent the concept of entanglement. The theory of quantum entanglement states that even if two particles are physically separated, they can still be connected. Karmic entanglement also speaks of the connection, regardless of space or time, between individuals, an individual to a group of people, or an individual to a belief. In this piece, traditional rules of the symbolic language of Palestinian embroidery are broken and a new translation of the motif is formulated. By understanding entanglement in visual or symbolic terms, an opportunity is created to consider the connecting force or frequency and recognise it as love. Threads emerge from and connect to the four squares centred in each motif, resembling the four chambers of the heart, removing the illusion of separateness while leaving behind the ultimate essence of oneness.

This piece currently on display in the Made In Tashkeel exhibition at Tashkeel in Dubai until September 10th.

https://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/art/tashkeel-s-summer-exhibition-celebrating-an-incredible-decade-of-achievement-1.878469

ARTICLE 5  mixed media on embroidery fabric  “No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”  This is my block in the UDHR Quilt project led by Tal Fitzpatrick and Stephanie Dunlap to celebrate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and promote awareness of violations happening all over the world. On my block of the quilt, I have hand embroidered the traditional Palestinian motif of the star of Bethlehem across the sky. Article 5 is stenciled on the separation wall representing the significance of graffiti and street art as a tool of communication in the public sphere in Palestine. More traditional Palestinian embroidery, such as Cyprus trees and ‘the walls of Jerusalem’ motifs run along the bottom of the panel under the wall representing the Palestinian land. Although Israel fails to comply with most of the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human rights, the violation of Article 5 is a succinct summation of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian people on their native land since 1948.  Now on view at the Museum of Australian Democracy. It is included on one of the four quilts of the “The #UDHRquilt Project: Craftivism, Quilts & Human Rights” exhibition.   https://quilts.moadoph.gov.au    http://talfitzpatrick.com/udhr-craftivism-project

ARTICLE 5

mixed media on embroidery fabric

“No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”

This is my block in the UDHR Quilt project led by Tal Fitzpatrick and Stephanie Dunlap to celebrate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and promote awareness of violations happening all over the world. On my block of the quilt, I have hand embroidered the traditional Palestinian motif of the star of Bethlehem across the sky. Article 5 is stenciled on the separation wall representing the significance of graffiti and street art as a tool of communication in the public sphere in Palestine. More traditional Palestinian embroidery, such as Cyprus trees and ‘the walls of Jerusalem’ motifs run along the bottom of the panel under the wall representing the Palestinian land. Although Israel fails to comply with most of the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human rights, the violation of Article 5 is a succinct summation of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian people on their native land since 1948.

Now on view at the Museum of Australian Democracy. It is included on one of the four quilts of the “The #UDHRquilt Project: Craftivism, Quilts & Human Rights” exhibition.

https://quilts.moadoph.gov.au

http://talfitzpatrick.com/udhr-craftivism-project

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME  mixed media on embroidery fabric  There is a collective desire amongst Palestinians living in diaspora to return to a liberated Palestine. For some it is like an adopted child’s longing for their biological parent, for others it is a nostalgic dream that seems so close but the reality is that the right of return is continually denied. Here, the reference to Dorothy in ruby red slippers from The Wizard of Oz returning home to Kansas after the catastrophe of the tornado and her displacement in Oz is represented by the the image of the Palestinian woman wearing the traditionally embroidered dress with the red shoes. The hand stitched embroidery of the Palestinian house motif repeated in the background creates the yellow brick road that Dorothy follows with her blind faith and hope for her return home.

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

mixed media on embroidery fabric

There is a collective desire amongst Palestinians living in diaspora to return to a liberated Palestine. For some it is like an adopted child’s longing for their biological parent, for others it is a nostalgic dream that seems so close but the reality is that the right of return is continually denied. Here, the reference to Dorothy in ruby red slippers from The Wizard of Oz returning home to Kansas after the catastrophe of the tornado and her displacement in Oz is represented by the the image of the Palestinian woman wearing the traditionally embroidered dress with the red shoes. The hand stitched embroidery of the Palestinian house motif repeated in the background creates the yellow brick road that Dorothy follows with her blind faith and hope for her return home.